Our mission is to help improve the lives of animals through rescue and education programs. We specialize primarily in Canines, but assist all animals in times of need. Our volunteers are experienced animal advocates and most are professionals in a variety of animal care and behavior fields. Our mission is to,
• Rescue neglected, abused, abandoned and otherwise needy animals in our region.
• Provide family style environments, training and medical care for animals in our program while awaiting adoption in forever homes.
• Reduce animal neglect and cruelty and also improve public safety by providing education materials and programs on all aspects of animal care, training and overall basic canine behavior.
• Establish animal disaster preparedness programs and personnel to provide safe evacuation and sanctuary to animals in times of crisis and emergencies.
• Provide recourses to help those in our community care for their companion animals thru community outreach events and programs aimed at not only helping companion animals, but their people too.

Based out of Graham, Washington

If you are interested in adopting or fostering any of these dogs, please message me or email us at valhallarescue@msn.com
You can also visit the website for more dogs that are up for adoption and upcoming adoption events.

 


They told me the big black Lab’s name was Reggie, as I looked at him lying in his pen. The shelter was clean, no-kill, and the people really friendly. I’d only been in the area for six months, but everywhere I went in the small college town, people were welcoming and open. Everyone waves when you pass them on the street.
But something was still missing as I attempted to settle in to my new life here, and I thought a dog couldn’t hurt. Give me someone to talk to. And I had just seen Reggie’s advertisement on the local news. The shelter said they had received numerous calls right after, but they said the people who had come down to see him just didn’t look like “Lab people,” whatever that meant. They must’ve thought I did.But at first, I thought the shelter had misjudged me in giving me Reggie and his things, which consisted of a dog pad, bag of toys almost all of which were brand new tennis balls, his dishes and a sealed letter from his previous owner.See, Reggie and I didn’t really hit it off when we got home. We struggled for two weeks (which is how long the shelter told me to give him to adjust to his new home). Maybe it was the fact that I was trying to adjust, too.Maybe we were too much alike.I saw the sealed envelope. I had completely forgotten about that. “Okay, Reggie,” I said out loud, “let’s see if your previous owner has any advice.”____________ _________ _________ _________To Whomever Gets My Dog:Well, I can’t say that I’m happy you’re reading this, a letter I told the shelter could only be opened by Reggie’s new owner. I’m not even happy writing it. He knew something was different.So let me tell you about my Lab in the hopes that it will help you bond with him and he with you.First, he loves tennis balls. The more the merrier. Sometimes I think he’s part squirrel, the way he hoards them. He usually always has two in his mouth, and he tries to get a third in there. Hasn’t done it yet. Doesn’tmatter where you throw them, he’ll bound after them, so be careful. Don’t do it by any roads.Next, commands. Reggie knows the obvious ones —-“sit,” “stay,” “come,” “heel.”He knows hand signals, too: He knows “ball” and “food” and “bone” and “treat” like nobody’s business.Feeding schedule: twice a day, regular store-bought stuff; the shelter has the brand.He’s up on his shots. Be forewarned: Reggie hates the vet. Good luck getting him in the car. I don’t know how he knows when it’s time to go to the vet, but he knows.Finally, give him some time. It’s only been Reggie and me for his whole life. He’s gone everywhere with me, so please include him on your daily car rides if you can. He sits well in the backseat, and he doesn’t bark or complain. He just loves to be around people, and me most especially.And that’s why I need to share one more bit of info with you…His name’s not Reggie. He’s a smart dog, he’ll get used to it and will respond to it, of that I have no doubt. But I just couldn’t bear to give them his real name. But if someone is reading this … well it means that his new owner should know his real name. His real name is “Tank.” Because, that is what I drive.I told the shelter that they couldn’t make “Reggie” available for adoption until they received word from my company commander. You see, my parents are gone, I have no siblings, no one I could’ve left Tank with .. and it was my only real request of the Army upon my deployment to Iraq, that they make one phone call to the shelter … in the “event” … to tell them that Tank could be put up for adoption. Luckily, my CO is a dog-guy, too, and he knew where my platoon was headed. He said he’d do it personally. And if you’re reading this, then he made good on his word.Tank has been my family for the last six years, almost as long as the Army has been my family. And now I hope and pray that you make him part of your family, too, and that he will adjust and come to love you the same way heloved me.If I have to give up Tank to keep those terrible people from coming to the US I am glad to have done so. He is my example of service and of love. I hope I honored him by my service to my country and comrades.All right, that’s enough. I deploy this evening and have to drop this letter off at the shelter. Maybe I’ll peek in on him and see if he finally got that third tennis ball in his mouth.Good luck with Tank. Give him a good home, and give him an extra kiss goodnight - every night - from me.Thank you,Paul Mallory____________ _________ _________ _______I folded the letter and slipped it back in the envelope. Sure, I had heard of Paul Mallory, everyone in town knew him, even new people like me. Local kid, killed in Iraq a few months ago and posthumously earning the SilverStar when he gave his life to save three buddies. Flags had been at half-mast all summer.I leaned forward in my chair and rested my elbows on my knees, staring at the dog.“Hey, Tank,” I said quietly.The dog’s head whipped up, his ears cocked and his eyes bright.“C’mere boy.”He was instantly on his feet, his nails clicking on the hardwood floor. He sat in front of me, his head tilted, searching for the name he hadn’t heard in months. “Tank,” I whispered.His tail swished.I kept whispering his name, over and over, and each time, his ears lowered, his eyes softened, and his posture relaxed as a wave of contentment just seemed to flood him. I stroked his ears, rubbed his shoulders, buried myface into his scruff and hugged him.“It’s me now, Tank, just you and me. Your old pal gave you to me.” Tank reached up and licked my cheek.“So whatdaya say we play some ball?” His ears perked again.“Yeah? Ball? You like that? Ball?”Tank tore from my hands and disappeared into the next room. And when he came back, he had three tennis balls in his mouth.”

They told me the big black Lab’s name was Reggie, as I looked at him lying in his pen. The shelter was clean, no-kill, and the people really friendly. I’d only been in the area for six months, but everywhere I went in the small college town, people were welcoming and open. Everyone waves when you pass them on the street.


But something was still missing as I attempted to settle in to my new life here, and I thought a dog couldn’t hurt. Give me someone to talk to. And I had just seen Reggie’s advertisement on the local news. The shelter said they had received numerous calls right after, but they said the people who had come down to see him just didn’t look like “Lab people,” whatever that meant. They must’ve thought I did.

But at first, I thought the shelter had misjudged me in giving me Reggie and his things, which consisted of a dog pad, bag of toys almost all of which were brand new tennis balls, his dishes and a sealed letter from his previous owner.

See, Reggie and I didn’t really hit it off when we got home. We struggled for two weeks (which is how long the shelter told me to give him to adjust to his new home). Maybe it was the fact that I was trying to adjust, too.
Maybe we were too much alike.

I saw the sealed envelope. I had completely forgotten about that. “Okay, Reggie,” I said out loud, “let’s see if your previous owner has any advice.”
____________ _________ _________ _________

To Whomever Gets My Dog:

Well, I can’t say that I’m happy you’re reading this, a letter I told the shelter could only be opened by Reggie’s new owner. I’m not even happy writing it. He knew something was different.

So let me tell you about my Lab in the hopes that it will help you bond with him and he with you.

First, he loves tennis balls. The more the merrier. Sometimes I think he’s part squirrel, the way he hoards them. He usually always has two in his mouth, and he tries to get a third in there. Hasn’t done it yet. Doesn’t
matter where you throw them, he’ll bound after them, so be careful. Don’t do it by any roads.

Next, commands. Reggie knows the obvious ones —-“sit,” “stay,” “come,” “heel.”

He knows hand signals, too: He knows “ball” and “food” and “bone” and “treat” like nobody’s business.

Feeding schedule: twice a day, regular store-bought stuff; the shelter has the brand.

He’s up on his shots. Be forewarned: Reggie hates the vet. Good luck getting him in the car. I don’t know how he knows when it’s time to go to the vet, but he knows.

Finally, give him some time. It’s only been Reggie and me for his whole life. He’s gone everywhere with me, so please include him on your daily car rides if you can. He sits well in the backseat, and he doesn’t bark or complain. He just loves to be around people, and me most especially.

And that’s why I need to share one more bit of info with you…His name’s not Reggie. He’s a smart dog, he’ll get used to it and will respond to it, of that I have no doubt. But I just couldn’t bear to give them his real name. But if someone is reading this … well it means that his new owner should know his real name. His real name is “Tank.” Because, that is what I drive.

I told the shelter that they couldn’t make “Reggie” available for adoption until they received word from my company commander. You see, my parents are gone, I have no siblings, no one I could’ve left Tank with .. and it was my only real request of the Army upon my deployment to Iraq, that they make one phone call to the shelter … in the “event” … to tell them that Tank could be put up for adoption. Luckily, my CO is a dog-guy, too, and he knew where my platoon was headed. He said he’d do it personally. And if you’re reading this, then he made good on his word.

Tank has been my family for the last six years, almost as long as the Army has been my family. And now I hope and pray that you make him part of your family, too, and that he will adjust and come to love you the same way he
loved me.

If I have to give up Tank to keep those terrible people from coming to the US I am glad to have done so. He is my example of service and of love. I hope I honored him by my service to my country and comrades.

All right, that’s enough. I deploy this evening and have to drop this letter off at the shelter. Maybe I’ll peek in on him and see if he finally got that third tennis ball in his mouth.

Good luck with Tank. Give him a good home, and give him an extra kiss goodnight - every night - from me.

Thank you,

Paul Mallory
____________ _________ _________ _______

I folded the letter and slipped it back in the envelope. Sure, I had heard of Paul Mallory, everyone in town knew him, even new people like me. Local kid, killed in Iraq a few months ago and posthumously earning the Silver
Star when he gave his life to save three buddies. Flags had been at half-mast all summer.

I leaned forward in my chair and rested my elbows on my knees, staring at the dog.

“Hey, Tank,” I said quietly.

The dog’s head whipped up, his ears cocked and his eyes bright.

“C’mere boy.”

He was instantly on his feet, his nails clicking on the hardwood floor. He sat in front of me, his head tilted, searching for the name he hadn’t heard in months. “Tank,” I whispered.

His tail swished.

I kept whispering his name, over and over, and each time, his ears lowered, his eyes softened, and his posture relaxed as a wave of contentment just seemed to flood him. I stroked his ears, rubbed his shoulders, buried my
face into his scruff and hugged him.

“It’s me now, Tank, just you and me. Your old pal gave you to me.” Tank reached up and licked my cheek.

“So whatdaya say we play some ball?” His ears perked again.

“Yeah? Ball? You like that? Ball?”

Tank tore from my hands and disappeared into the next room. And when he came back, he had three tennis balls in his mouth.”

Gaia has been adopted today. She now has a forever home :)

Gaia has been adopted today. She now has a forever home :)

Ginger is an approximately a 6 year old purebred Rottweiler. Her owner was going in to have a liver transplant and that left her with no where to go during that time and after, so we took her into our rescue. Ginger is not ready for her forever home just yet as she is on a strict diet due to being over weight, but applications will be taken for when she is ready to go. She will need a home where there are no stairs or just a few if possible. She shows no aggressions towards other animals, but she does not take too well to blonde haired people for some reason, which we are unable to understand. At this time we are listing her as a medical needs due to her weight and leg pains She is housebroken, and will be spayed and UTD on her vaccines once she is ready for her new home. She is also microchipped Ginger walks well on a leash although she does require frequent rest breaks on her walks. She will also need a patient person willing to walk her, as she does need the exercise, but also willing to be patient on these walks for her rest times. Valhalla Rescue is willing and able to provide plenty of advice, training and knowledge to help you easily acclimate. As usual, a fenced yard is preferred. Her Adoption fee is $200. You may contact Anne, her foster mom at valhallaresq2@yahoo.com

Ginger is an approximately a 6 year old purebred Rottweiler. Her owner was going in to have a liver transplant and that left her with no where to go during that time and after, so we took her into our rescue. Ginger is not ready for her forever home just yet as she is on a strict diet due to being over weight, but applications will be taken for when she is ready to go. She will need a home where there are no stairs or just a few if possible. She shows no aggressions towards other animals, but she does not take too well to blonde haired people for some reason, which we are unable to understand. At this time we are listing her as a medical needs due to her weight and leg pains She is housebroken, and will be spayed and UTD on her vaccines once she is ready for her new home. She is also microchipped Ginger walks well on a leash although she does require frequent rest breaks on her walks. She will also need a patient person willing to walk her, as she does need the exercise, but also willing to be patient on these walks for her rest times. Valhalla Rescue is willing and able to provide plenty of advice, training and knowledge to help you easily acclimate. As usual, a fenced yard is preferred. Her Adoption fee is $200. You may contact Anne, her foster mom at valhallaresq2@yahoo.com

Gaia was once a shelter dog held by the courts in an animal abuse case. Pregnant and no longer needed as evidence, she rescued from the shelter only hours before she was to be euthanized and 5 days before she gave birth to a wonderful litter or 11 beautiful puppies. Gaia has been in foster care with her puppies, who are now all ready to find their forever homes and so is she. Gaia is a wonderful, loving dog that gets along well with all the dogs she meets and also with the other animals on the property. Gaia did have mastitis due to her pregnancy, but is now fully recovered with no permanent lasting effects. She is spayed, up to date on all her vaccines, mirco-chipped and ready to find her forever home. Her adoption fee is $250. A fenced yard is preferred due to her breed and a family that is willing to give this fantastic dog the great life she deserves is mandatory.

Steve is a beautiful Aussie. He is about 1 1/2 yr old and gets along well with other animals, dog savvy cats included, and would love to have a home with a companion animal for company. Steve was rescued from the shelter and due to his merle coloring, He does have some slight vision issues, but does not require any special care. Steve will need help with fears he developed from the shelter. Steve prefers women over men and is frightened of hoses. He has come a long way and is a wonderful companion for an active family that understands herding dogs. His new adopter will need to continue to work with him and help him grow. He is a great dog and is sure to improve with continued training. Steve is a typical Aussie Steve has excellent house training skills and walks very well on a leash . He is still working on his basic commands, but is a fast learner and very willing to please people he trusts. He would do best in a home with a securely fenced yard and with people who understand the breed with the time to exercise and play with Steve. Steve has been neutered, is up to date on all his vaccines, microchipped dewormed and a complete health exam. All you need to supply is love. His adoption fee is $200.

Fudge is an adorable 18 week old American Bulldog mix that is ready for his forever home. To meet Fudge and his siblings visit our website, www.valhallarescue.org and complete our application under the adoptables tab. If you have any questions about Fudge, contact Valhalla Rescue at valhallarescue@msn.com. My adoption fee is $250.00 and includes current vaccines, spay/neuter and microchip. Hope to meet you soon.

Angel is a one of a kind amazing pitbull. Born breech in E. WA., Angel’s mother accidentally bit off her back feet, but amazingly Angel has survived not only that, but much more and has thrived. Her story is unique and she even has her own facebook page. A survivor all the way, Angel is seeking her forever home that will not only help her grow into an amazing dog, but help her to be an ambassador of her breed. Angel has had all her medical work done and we are hoping to find her a home that will continue to provide her with the care and experiences she loves and needs. Her adoption fee is $275 and includes all her past vetting and future assistance for her medical needs. IF you think you are the special home for this special dog, please contact us via email or thru our website at valhallarescue.org.

ABBEY is a sweet Deaf Great Dane in need of a forever home. Large and good natured Abbey would love to have a home with people and other dogs to keep her entertained and secure. Like many Deaf dogs, Abbey does not do well left alone for long periods of time and does best when able to rely on other dogs or humans for visual cues. If you would like to meet Abbey or learn more about her, contact us at valhallarescue@msn.com or visit our website www.valhallarescue.org and fill out an application under our adoptables section to be considered as Abbey’s forever home. Her adoption fee is $250. She is spayed, utd on all her vaccines and microchipped. Abbey would do best in a securely fenced yard for her safety since she cannot hear cars or other dangers. Thank you for looking at this incredible, unique dog.